Posts in the “Arcade Games” Category

Invasion Force

Invasion Force (catalog number 26-1906) was one of the first action games Radio Shack published for the TRS‑80 Model I. It was written by Robert Arnstein and introduced in 1979 on cassette for a price of $14.95. There never was a disk version of Invasion Force. Radio Shack also released a game for the PC-2 named Invasion Force (catalog number 26-3705), but it had only a loose connection to the Model I/III version.

Radio Shack Games Packs

Most people considered the Big Five Software games to be the finest games ever written for the TRS‑80 Model I and III. They were sold directly through Big Five and were resold by many other companies.

Radio Shack also sold Big Five games in two collections compiled by Cogito Software. Games Pack Two and Games Pack Three first appeared in the 1984 Radio Shack catalog and contained four Big Five games: Defense Command, Stellar Escort, Cosmic Fighter and Meteor Mission 2.

Neutroid

Neutroid was written by Nickolas Marentes in 1983 and sold through his company, Fun Division (known earlier as Supersoft Software). It was the third of seven games that he wrote for the TRS–80 Model I and Model III. Nickolas Marentes became better known for his later TRS–80 Color Computer games such as Donut Dilemma (which began with a Model I version) and Rupert Rythym.

Olympic Decathlon

Olympic Decathlon, sometimes known as Microsoft Olympic Decathlon, was one of the first sports related programs to mix game and simulation. It was written by Timothy W. Smith and sold by Microsoft Consumer Products. The original TRS‑80 version cost $24.95 and was released in 1980. It was followed by an Apple II version in 1981 and an IBM PC version in 1982.

Bounceoids

There were many unofficial adaptations of the Atari arcade game Asteroids written for the TRS‑80. Super Nova from Big Five Software and Planetoids from Adventure International were considered among the best.

Bounceoids (not “Bounceroids” as some sources state) was an Asteroids-inspired game written by Robert Pappas (author of Frogger and Crazy Painter) and sold by the Cornsoft Group.

Armored Patrol

Armored Patrol was one of the most popular TRS‑80 games, described by Owen Linzmayer in Creative Computing as “a classic in every sense of the word.” It was distributed by Adventure International and written by Wayne Westmoreland and Terry Gilman, the first of their games for the TRS‑80. Unlike their other Adventure International games, Armored Patrol was never ported to any other computers.

Armored Patrol was based on the arcade game Battlezone, released by Atari in 1980.

Donkey Kong

Wayne Westmoreland and Terry Gilman wrote some of the best games for the TRS‑80 Model I and III, including classics such as Sea Dragon and The Eliminator. When Wayne Westmoreland released all of their games to the public domain in 1995, TRS‑80 owners received an unexpected treat: Donkey Kong, a previously unreleased TRS‑80 game.

Donkey Kong was based on the Nintendo arcade game of the same name from 1981.

Space Colony

Space Colony was a TRS‑80 adaptation of the 1978 Taito arcade game hit Space Invaders. It was written by Kim Watt and sold through his own company, Breeze Computing. Kim Watt was better known in the TRS‑80 world for his disk utility, Super Utility. Some sources say that Space Colony was also distributed by Adventure International, but I haven’t found it listed in any catalog.

Interestingly, Space Colony wasn’t the first version of Space Invaders that Kim Watt wrote for the TRS‑80.

Crazy Painter

Crazy Painter qualifies as one of the few completely unique TRS‑80 games. It was written by Robert Pappas, author of the TRS‑80 games Frogger and Bounceoids. Crazy Painter was released by the Cornsoft Group in 1982. In addition to the TRS‑80 version, the Cornsoft Group also released a version of Crazy Painter in 1983, written by Charles Guy, for the TRS‑80 Color Computer. But there was no connection to the 1983 BBC Micro game named Crazy Painter, which was sold by Superior Software.

Panik

Panik was not based on any particular arcade game; as one advertisement described it: “It has a little of all arcade games built in, but is its own original game.