Posts in the “Software” Category - page 4

Scarfman

Scarfman was based on the arcade game Pac-Man, which was released by Namco in 1980. It was written by Philip Oliver and distributed by the Cornsoft Group. The Cornsoft Group also released a version of Scarfman for the Color Computer.
The game starts with you (the “Scarfman”) at the bottom of the screen. Like Pac-Man, the goal of Scarfman is to eat all of the dots on the screen. You earn points for every dot eaten.

Android Nim

Android Nim was Leo Christopherson’s first game for the TRS‑80. It was featured on the cover of 80-Northwest Journal (later 80-U.S. Journal) in November 1978 and was released by 80-NW Publishing (later 80-U.S. Software). The cost was $8.00 for cassette and $13.00 for disk, with a $2.00 discount for 80-Northwest Journal subscribers. The game helped to popularize the magazine, and 80-U.S. Journal used an android for its mascot until 1981.

Model I TRSDOS Versions

TRSDOS 2.0 was the first version of Model I TRSDOS to be released to the public. All earlier versions had been used for testing within Radio Shack only. It came with a preliminary instruction manual, with a final manual promised for the near future. Not many people used TRSDOS 2.0 because it was replaced by TRSDOS 2.1 after only a short time.

Model I TRSDOS Disk BASIC Commands

Model I TRSDOS Disk BASIC contained a number of extra commands and enhancements to Level II BASIC, not all related to disk. The commands were documented in the TRSDOS 2.3 Reference Manual. All other TRS‑80 operating systems with a Disk BASIC supported these commands, although often CMD and NAME used different syntax.

Model I TRSDOS Commands

The Model I TRSDOS command shell supported a number of internal commands, as documented by the TRSDOS 2.3 Reference Manual. Most of the commands were also supported by other TRS‑80 operating systems, although they usually added extra features beyond the TRSDOS versions.

TRSDOS for the Model I

TRSDOS, referred to as DOS in some early references, was Radio Shack’s official disk operating system for the Model I. The name stood for Tandy Radio Shack Disk Operating System. It was bundled with Radio Shack’s floppy disk upgrade, but it could also be purchased separately.

Frogger

Although there were many Frogger adaptations for the TRS‑80, this Cornsoft Group version was licensed by Sega and was the "official" Frogger. The premise of Frogger is simple. The goal is to guide as many frogs as possible back to their homes, crossing a busy road and dangerous river in the process.

The TRS‑80 version of Frogger offers the choice of five difficulty levels and an option to play background music.

Outhouse

Outhouse is probably the TRS‑80 game with the most bizarre premise. It was written by J. Weaver Jr. (Factory Programming) and distributed by Soft Sector Marketing.

T80-FS1 Flight Simulator

The T80-FS1 Flight Simulator was a groundbreaking simulation program for the TRS‑80, written by Bruce Artwick and released by SubLOGIC in February 1980. It was based on A2-FS1, the original Apple II version of the Flight Simulator, also written by Bruce Artwick and released a few months earlier. From the introduction to the T80-FS1 user’s manual:

The T80-FS1 is the second version of the FS1 program.

Nukliex

Nukliex was written in 1984 by Dennis Lo, and released through JMG Software International. Although the game’s title screen clearly identifies itself as “Nukliex”, it was always advertised as “Nucliex”. When you start Nukliex, you can select a difficulty level between 1 and 10. You control a ship located at the bottom of the screen that fires shots toward the top. Asteroids and aliens attack you from above. This is pretty standard for most games of this type.