TRS‑80 Programs: 32 BASIC Programs for the TRS‑80 (Level II) Computer

written by Matthew Reed

Title:TRS‑80 Programs: 32 BASIC Programs for the TRS‑80 (Level II) Computer
Authors:
Publisher:dilithium Press
Publication date:
Number of pages:267
ISBN:0-91839-827-4

In the early days of microcomputers, books containing “type-in” BASIC programs were common. But probably the book series published for the widest range of computers was the “32 BASIC Programs” series, written by Tom Rugg and Phil Feldman and published by dilithium Press. (The name dilithium was intentionally lowercase.)

Each book contained thirty-two BASIC programs divided into six categories: applications, educational, graphics, game, mathematics, and miscellaneous. Some of the later books added seven extra programs spread across the same categories.

The text of each book was almost identical, sometimes with just the name of the computer changed. Of course, the programs themselves and the screenshots illustrating each program were necessarily different for each new computer.

The TRS‑80 entry in the series was titled TRS‑80 Programs: 32 BASIC Programs for the TRS‑80 (Level II) Computer. Judging by the publication dates, it was the second book in the series, immediately following the Commodore PET version.

32 BASIC Programs for the Atari Computer

In addition to a program listing, each program also featured a list of routines and variables, a list of “Easy changes” that could be made, and a list of “Suggested projects” for the more advanced reader.

Probably the best remembered of the programs in the books was “Walloons.” Described (in the TRS‑80 book) as a presentation of the “TRS‑80 Theatre,” the Flying Walloons performed “a dangerous trick from their repertoire” involving a seesaw. This was one of the primary differences between the earlier books: the Commodore PET version was presented by the “PET Playhouse” and the Apple version by the “Apple Arena.” Most of the later versions were presented by the “Color Circus.”

Categories: Books

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