Posts tagged with “MISOSYS”

EnhComp

EnhComp was a BASIC compiler written by Philip Oliver for the TRS‑80 Model III and Model 4. (Longtime TRS‑80 users probably remember Philip Oliver for his excellent game Scarfman.) Oliver wrote two versions of EnhComp: the original published by the Cornsoft Group of Indianapolis, Indiana in 1980 and the more popular second version (whose full name was the Enhanced BASIC Compiler Development System) sold by MISOSYS of Sterling, Virginia starting in 1986.

The MISOSYS Quarterly

The MISOSYS Quarterly, better known as TMQ, was the official newsletter for MISOSYS, a software company based in Sterling, Virginia. It was published by Roy Soltoff, the “system designer of TRSDOS 6.0” and co-founder of Logical Systems (the creators of LDOS and LS‑DOS). The MISOSYS Quarterly was far more than just a company newsletter, and was one of the best technical resources for the TRS‑80 Model III and Model 4.

The MISOSYS Hard Drive Kit

The MISOSYS Hard Drive Kit was a hard drive interface for the TRS‑80 Model III, Model 4, and Lobo MAX‑80. (There was no version for the TRS‑80 Model I.) It was announced in the Spring/Summer 1989 issue of The MISOSYS Quarterly and began shipping in September 1989. It came in in two configurations: 20 MB and 40 MB.

Although Roy Soltoff described the MISOSYS Hard Drive Kit as a “pre-assembled kit,” it came fully assembled, tested, and ready to connect to the TRS‑80.

PRO-WAM

PRO-WAM (also known as PRO-NTO) is a collection of pop-up tools for LS‑DOS/TRSDOS 6 on the TRS‑80 Model 4. It was written by Karl Hessinger and Roy Soltoff and cost $59.95 when it was introduced in December 1984.

PRO-WAM was one of the few programs to require a Model 4 expanded to a full 128K of memory. In my opinion, it was one of the best uses of the extra memory and one of my favorite Model 4 utilities.

The XLR8er

The XLR8er (pronounced accelerator) was a speed-up and memory expansion board for the TRS‑80 Model 4, regarded by many to be the ultimate Model 4 expansion. The XLR8er replaced the Model 4 Z80 CPU with an enhanced microprocessor that offered 256K of additional memory (for a total of 384K) and up to double the speed. The XLR8er originally sold for $299.95 (with memory) when H.I. Tech, Inc. introduced it around 1986, but that price soon dropped to $249.95.

Super Utility

I suspect that almost everyone who used a TRS‑80 disk system remembers Super Utility. First released by Kim Watt in 1980 through his company Breeze Computing, Super Utility was regarded by many to be an indispensible tool. It was described in advertisements as “The King of Utilities” and readers of 80 Micro must have agreed; they voted it 1st Place in the utility category for both the 1982 and 1983 Readers’ Choice Awards.

The Lobo LX‑80 Expansion Interface

The LX‑80 was an alternative to the Radio Shack Expansion Interface that took a different approach to compatibility than the competition. It was originally announced by Lobo Drives International in Fall of 1979, but problems with the supplied operating system meant that it wasn’t released until closer to 1981. The original price was $799 (without memory), although that price had been reduced to $510 by late 1982.

DoubleDuty

DoubleDuty is a utility that uses the full 128K of a TRS‑80 Model 4 to allow more than one program to be run at one time. Introduced by Radio Shack in 1984, DoubleDuty was written by Randy Cook, the author of Model I TRSDOS and VTOS.
DoubleDuty works by creating three sections, called partitions, out of the Model 4 memory. Partitions one and two each contain a complete Model 4 TRSDOS system. The third partition is reserved for running TRSDOS library commands.

Frogger

Although there were many Frogger adaptations for the TRS‑80, this Cornsoft Group version was licensed by Sega and was the "official" Frogger. The premise of Frogger is simple. The goal is to guide as many frogs as possible back to their homes, crossing a busy road and dangerous river in the process.

The TRS‑80 version of Frogger offers the choice of five difficulty levels and an option to play background music.

The Programmer’s Guide To LDOS/TRSDOS Version 6

The Programmer’s Guide is my favorite TRS‑80 programming book, and in my opinion, the most useful.