Posts tagged with “80 Micro”

Wayne Green (1922-2013)

I was saddened to learn that Wayne Green died on September 13, 2013. Longtime TRS‑80 enthusiasts will remember Wayne Green as the founder and publisher of , the most famous and best remembered TRS‑80 magazine.

Wayne Green had a long history in publishing. He began his first newsletter, Amateur Radio Frontiers, in 1951, reflecting his lifelong interest in amateur radio (his callsign was W2NSD). He became editor of CQ, an amateur radio magazine, in 1955.

News From Kitchen Table Software, Inc.

One of the most popular columns in the TRS‑80 magazine 80 Microcomputing wasn’t about the TRS‑80 at all. In fact, despite appearing to be a news column, it wasn’t about real products or companies. It was “News From Kitchen Table Software, Inc.”

80 Microcomputing

80 Microcomputing, also known as 80 Micro, was the most famous of the TRS‑80 magazines and the best remembered. It was the first of the platform-specific computer magazines to become very popular, creating a model that many other magazines followed. Harry McCracken, former editor-in-chief of PC World, described PC World as “essentially an 80 Micro clone that happened to be about Windows, not TRS‑80’s.

The Assembly Line

“The Assembly Line” was a column about assembly language programming which first appeared in the April 1980 issue of 80 Microcomputing. It was written by William Barden, well known for his books about assembly language such as the Z80 Microcomputer Handbook, TRS‑80 Assembly Language Programming, and Programming Techniques for Level II BASIC.

Computer User

Computer User was a short-lived TRS‑80 magazine created by the publishers of Interface Age, a popular computer magazine that began in 1976.

Unlike many other TRS‑80 magazines, Computer User was a professional, glossy publication from its first issue in November 1983. It was heavily promoted, with promotional copies of the premiere issue sent to subscribers of competing magazines.

How popular were the TRS‑80 magazines?

80 Microcomputing, later 80 Micro, was the most popular of the TRS‑80 magazines. It was ranked the seventh fastest growing magazine in 1982 and was the third thickest magazine that year. (Those figures were for all magazines, not just computer magazines.)

80 Microcomputing began publishing in 1980, and its circulation rose steadily until it topped 124,000 readers in 1983. Circulation began a slow decline after that although subscriptions picked up slightly in 1985.

The Next Step

“The Next Step” was a popular column written by Hardin Brothers that began in the February 1983 issue of 80 Micro. Originally conceived as a five part column about integrating BASIC and assembly language, “The Next Step” went on to become one of the longest running columns in the magazine.

The focus of “The Next Step” was programming the TRS‑80 in assembly language. It covered the Model I and Model III at first, but had largely switched to the Model 4 by 1984.

The Gamer’s Cafe

“The Gamer’s Cafe” was a column about TRS‑80 gaming which ran in 80 Micro magazine. It first appeared in the November 1982 issue near the height of the TRS‑80 game market and ran until April 1984. “The Gamer’s Cafe” had some similarities to “Captain 80,” a column written by Bob Liddil that premiered in the first issue of 80 Microcomputing in 1980 and later appeared in 80-U.S. Journal.